Skip to main content

About your Search

20130113
20130121
STATION
MSNBCW 8
CNNW 2
CSPAN 2
MSNBC 2
CNN 1
FBC 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 21
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
in 1993 the 46-year-old bill clinton took the oath of office for the first time. he became the first baby boomer in the white house and told the country that change is not something to fear. >> when our founders boldly declared america's independence to the world and our purposes to the almighty, they knew that america to endure would have to change. not change for change's sake, but change to preserve america's ideals, life, liberty, the pursuit of happiness. though we march to the music of our time, our mission is timeless. each generation of americans must define what it means to be an american. >> well, bill clinton, who had a history of being long-winded, went on to deliver what aides said was the third shortest inaugural address in american history. we'll be right back. both of us actually. our pharmacist recommended it. and that makes me feel pretty good about it. and then i heard about a study looking at multivitamins and the long term health benefits. and what do you know? they used centrum silver in the study. makes me feel even better, that's what i take. sorry, we take. [ male
must define what it means to be an american. >> well, bill clinton, who had a history of being long-winded, went on to deliver what aides said was the third shortest inaugural address in american history. we'll be right back. absorb calcium, caltrate's double the d. it now has more than any other brand to help maximize calcium absorption. so caltrate women can move the world. >>> welcome back to "hardball." in his final press conference of his first presidential term president obama went on offense warning republicans not to play politics with the debt ceiling. here is some of what he had to say. >> raising the debt ceiling does not authorize more spending. it simply allows the country to pay for spending that congress has already committed to. if congressional republicans refuse to pay america's bills on time, social security checks and veterans' benefits will be delayed. we might not be able to pay our troops our honor our contracts with small business owners. markets could go haywire, interest rates would spike for anybody who borrows money, every home own we are a mortgage. it w
president bill clinton gave the film its most ringing endorsement yet saying that is shows how all of the great decisions in american history were forged in, quote, a cauldron of principle and compromise. now, that's a lovely phrase, of course, but is it true? let's bring in thomas frank of harper's magazine. good afternoon, tom. >> hey, martin. >> thank you for looking in my direction. now, tom, what is wrong with you because everyone from david brooks to bill clinton is in love with this film, but you say in your latest column, "lincoln" is a move ni that makes viewers feel noble at first but on reflection the sentiment feels hollow. it's not only a hackneyed film but a mendacious one as well. what is wrong with you? >> i don't know, martin. it's something -- it's congenital or something. i'm always like this. i'm always going the wrong direction, but it doesn't surprise me that bill clinton is going to celebrate something like this. i mean, come on. this is a man that invented triangulation. and you think of all the great triumphs of triangulation, of bipartisanship in the clint
bill clinton wanted al gore to win. barack obama doesn't have that. the two front runners or maybe three, but two within his administration, whether bide own runs probably hinges on whether hilary runs. that doesn't seem to be an extension of what he does today. is that right? >> i think that's wrong. i have my own take on it. i have my own system to predicting elections. it's called the dees the white house. and it's how well think party holding the white house has governed, whether or not the sitting president is running again. so if barack obama wants to extend -- which is very difficult, have three democratic presidents in a row, it is all going to depend on his success in governing and leading the country. if he is success, and comes out as a very popular president who has achieved something, then there's an excellent chance that the democrats are capture another term in the white house. if he doesn't. if he leaves as a failed president like george w. bush, then we'll get a change in party power in 2016 and this is true regardless of the identity of the
that happened was with bill clinton. we will share with you some thoughts by jerry is joining us from detroit on the democrats' line, good morning. caller: what makes this inauguration so much more significant that it is taking place on martin luther king jr. birthday. dr. king was certainly a hero of mine and certainly to president obama. and certainly to anyone who believes in equality and social justice. host: on the republican line, steve is joining us from virginia, good morning. caller: is important to look at what has been accomplished in the first four years. the values the -- the value of united states dollar has been reduced by 50% and the value of gold has gone up. everybody on welfare has half as much money to use and all the contributors have golden safety deposit boxes. the rich got richer, and the poor have gotten poorer, let's hope the second term as a little bit more appropriate. host: thanks for the call. from "the national journal "-- the richard nixon inaugurals parade a pesticide to get rid of pigeons. calvin coolidge was sworn in by his own father and ulysses s. grant wa
a decade ago to when bill clinton was president and the government did shut down. who got the blame for that? it was congressional republicans. and that's why it's interesting that congressional republicans this time around taken such a hard line saying we're ready to go and let the government default if we don't get more spending cuts. >> what do you think is the strategy there looking at history and not very distant history, shira? >> i think that's, frankly, all republican haves to bargain with at this point. they're bargaining and when the president was at the podium today he essentially said your move, congress. come up with the next idea. but generally, that's all they have. they have the majority in the house. and in that case, it's not a very controlled caucus. it's a very fractured caucus. democrats controlling the senate and the white house. they don't have a good bargaining position here again. all they can do is appeal to the base and american people they want more spending cuts. >> jimmy, congresswoman morris, a republican quoted on politico saying i think it's possible
turn and below bill clinton, and 51%. and he said i'm going to close gitmo, that did not work out his way and almost everybody said it would be impossible to close because we've got a problem, we have nowhere to put those people. >> he said he'd close it in the first year. >> the first thing he signed. >> absolutely. the left plank after he didn't do it the first year, he'll do it the second year and the third year and the fourth year. >> harder when he's a candidate to an achieve. the economy, they said if they passed the massive unemployment, it'd keep under 8%, it was spiked up to 10% and down to 7.8 and they say it's a fail. and killed osama bin laden, and passed health care, what kind of program we'll be we're only getting it now, it passed two years ago. >> alisyn: and iraq, promised to end iraq and making steps towards that as well. >> iraq and afghanistan. >> although unemployment continues to be a problem. i read this morning one more person unemployed, manti te'o's imagery girlfriend has lost her job. >> her imagery job. >> she didn't show up. >> we found out she was alive b
plus bill clinton. after all, it was a decisive victory, but it was a victory for the man, not necessarily the party. >> is that how you read it, john? do you see this being an obama victory as opposed to a liberal victory or they intertwined? >> i never want to disagree too much with one of the greater politicians in american history, but i would suggest that there was a little more party there. you won a couple u.s. senate seats that they weren't supposed to win sometimes because of republican flubs. 1.4 million more people voted for democrats for the house than voted for republicans, only gerrymandering kept the house where it is. and so i think that this man has done a lot to build a broad progressive coalition, but your core question is the important one. can you hold that coalition together? >> mayor -- >> let me say this to you though, i believe that it would have been a more telling benefit for the party if it had been nancy pelosi re-emerging as the speaker of the house and if democrat governors had won in the numbers that they needed to win in as well as legislat
bill clinton, but they were a slightly more reasonable party in terms of reaching compromises on other issues with clinton from that point forward. >> let me ask you. if they're just threatening a downgrade, again, what is your view on how bad that is for the u.s. economy? ? i mean, there are lots of perilous things that will kick into place. >> in the short-term, sadly, perversely not so bad. >> right. >> i don't think it's going to have a huge impact on -- short-term. the question is it's a long-term thing, and that's two, three, four, five, ten years out, and that's what you are fighting against. yeah, short-term, i don't think anyone will care. >> nobody goes to fish to decide -- >> why do they rate treasuries? go, fitch. go away, s&p. we know what the interest rates are. that's how people think of debt. >> what we are capable of, and are we -- >> pa what our standing should be and what our rating should be. there's no question. i don't think in the short-term we have any -- and, sadly, that gives no cover to anybody in washington on this issue. >> it does not. well, we will certai
, bill clinton. >> enormous. oh, my god, that's bill clinton? he's here? i'm missing bill clinton by sitting here? >> talking to me. >> al, you know i see you a lot. >> ben affleck, "argo." >> there was this groundswell of people rooting for you especially because of what they felt was a snub from the oscar nominations. >> in terms of the oscars, look, i was thrilled, we got seven nominations including best picture. if you told me a year ago, would you take that, line me up. >> "girls," hbo. >> any time where you're reading the script or finishing a scene and thought, maybe we could have pulled back a little bit? >> no. >> no. >> probably not. >> does it put a little more pressure on you to ratchet things up or to make sure you keep things where they are? >> i think we're always pretty inspired to ratchet things up and we have sort of our own creative agenda. >> honestly, i think we can just coast now. coast on past glory. >> claire danes, "homeland." >> i have to thank, you know, our son now. my son, cyrus, who is up there with my parents. >> congratulations. >> thank you very mu
to see in the progression of history when bill clinton became president, a generation had passed that world war ii group had moved and were no longer going to be presidents. it seems to me we are now past the vietnam stage wheith presidt obama. it is difficult for me. i think joe biden wants to be president and he'll run for president at this very moment, but i think it's a tough sell for both vice president biden and hillary clinton because you are going back a generation. part of this president's appeal has been to young people. >> it is. my experience in all of this is the same that once america moves forward a generation, it almost never moves back and that was a problem for the mccains and even the romneys of this world. however -- when you're the vp, you get one shot to extend. you are defined by the guy above you. so, you get to ride on the previous generation. >> he gets younger. >> he's the youngest guy in this town, too. >> benjamin button. >> i talked to a veteran democratic actrist strategist who has been involved and she told me within 48 hours she got a call from bo
clinton strolled on stage to introduce the movie "lincoln." >> a tough fight to push a bill through a bitterly divided house of representatives. winning it required the president to make a lot of unsavory deals that had nothing to do with the big issue. i wouldn't know anything about that. >> people are still parsing today, the famously private jodie foster's acceptance speech for a lifetime achievement award. >> i have given everything up there from the time that i was 3 years old. that's reality show enough, don't you think? >> but would you like to know the highlight of my night? it was getting to meet and interview 26, 26, quickly going on 27, lena dunham who won best tv actress and comedy for one of my favorite shows on right now, "girls" on hbo. so watch this. >> i just wanted to start, sorry, i'm super shaky. i wanted to start by saying the other nominees in this category are women that inspire me deeply and have made me laugh and comforted me at the darkest moments of my life. julia, tina, amy and zoe respectively have gotten me through middle school. and i worship them. >>
lbj and trying to get drinks with -- how come you're not like bill clinton and not inviting mitch mcconnell and harry reid to camp david. how come you're not like ronald reagan and throwing back whiskey with tip o'neill. it is that stuff, as you've been noting and he pointed out, he does this but i think this is where there's a little bit of disconnect. i think there are people on the outside and look at what other presidents -- and say, why don't you do this more? the white house will say, guess what, people used to say the same thing about clinton and reagan. my guess is the truth's somewhere in between. it's not exactly as if the president uses his golf game to lobby members of congress, he doesn't. not as if he has a card game once a month he's bringing over the leader. he doesn't do things like that. is that part of the job description? >> the president said at the press conference yesterday, he has played golf with john boehner, does a good golf game. it didn't help in the negotiations. boehner keeps refusing invitations to multiple state dinners. there seems to be a problem wh
with the federal response to hurricane katrina there was the iraq war. you also had, you know, bill clinton everybody remembers, what happened in his second term. what are the potential problems that lie ahead for this president? >> well, i think any president who wins a second term clearly wants to fet -- get a lot accomplished. they feel freed up to do the things they hope they wanted to do, they figure voters endorsed them and endorsed everything they said they were going to do. that is actually not the case. a lot of times voters decided they like the incumbent than the other guy, trusted him more than the other guy he was running against of the you have members from your own party, you're on your way out two years from now and four years from now, why do we have to stick our neck out for big things but we have to pay the price and we would like to stick around for a while. having said that, for all the problems bill clinton had in effect in his second term he pick up seats, his party did in the 1998 midterms. when you look at george w. bush and his presidency, republicans had been in c
may go out. i think we are set. connell: dagen mentioned the former president bill clinton. if he were an office, he would bring you and. if he had this position and he said he will not negotiate, what would you tell him? >> i would say the american people want more. it is right that if we defaulted and i hope that does not happen, the republicans would be blamed. the president's approach is much more conciliatory than this process. dagen: if the democrats are winning every battle, why on the flip side, are losing everyone? how do they find some middle ground? >> first, the republican party it self is deeply divided. [ laughter ] we heard from: powell yesterday and even if that may be an overstatement, it certainly reflects the view of someone who is a preeminent republican. connell: the last time, we could afford to go over the cliff if we had to, it would not have been the end of time. you are playing with fire. >> you sure are. that is what the president will use and hold over the republicans. that they are playing with fire. the president is, unfortunately, in my view, not willing
the deep end. and that's when bill clinton and like you said the dlc brought them together. here's the really disturbing thing. i remember, mike, back in 1995, a lot of people were talking about colin powell running for president. and i didn't want colin powell to run for president. he was a moderate. i was a conservative. but it wasn't the entire party and me against colin powell. like there were moderates in the center of the party. and we had this very positive give and take. >> what's happened? >> this tug. >> what's happened? >> the moderates in the party have collapsed. >> where are those voices coming from? >> i am now considered by a lot of the right-wing looneys to be a moderate, to be a, quote, rino. anybody that's listened to anything i've said on taxes, on the budget, on the fiscal cliff, i mean, i think my party made a horrible mistake on the fiscal cliff, and yes, i would stare at the president on a government shutdown and say, yeah, maybe shutting down the government's reckless, but you know what's even more reckless? continuing to spend the way you and harry reid
the optimism -- technology sector? what are the lessons that come from this? the other day bill clinton was saying we cannot really expect our businesses to compete internationally if they only have access to the speed of curia. he is right. rolee outline technology's and repositioning the u.s. as the world's innovation leader tonight on the communicators at 8:00 eastern on c-span2. >> now the new america foundation discussing the status of the guantanamo bay detention center. last week was the 11th anniversary of the opening. >> welcome to the new america foundation. it is the 11th anniversary of the opening of guantanamo. we have an exceptionally well- informed, to talk about that. we have pretty much the same group, exactly the same group speaking in this room one year ago. i asked and the worthington how many people have been released since the event one year ago and the answer is four there is still 166 detainees at guantanamo the question that this panel -- the big question is -- is the obama administration moving towards a policy of indefinite detention? first up to speak will be
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)